fbpx

Ioana Ardelean

Ioana Ardelean

Ioana Ardelean 500 751 Dautor

AUTOR is a story imagined and built by passionate people, who inspire through courage and creativity. We want you to discover all the AUTOR people and let them stimulate you with their story and their creations.

Ioana Ardelean is an architect, she teaches architecture at Ion Mincu University of Architecture and Urbanism in Bucharest and she is an author and admirer of contemporary jewelry.
Design jewelry represents first of all the privilege of the craftsmanship that involves both the hand and the mind, the approach of transforming an abstract idea to a palpable reality. The process of working with the material and transforming it, gives me the most interesting field of experiment. I use the perspective of the architect, in fact many of my pieces are rewritings of my own architecture projects, or new expressions for concepts that I have already studied in architecture. There is a difference of scale that fascinates me, the scale of the detail or of the jewel but also the scale of architecture and even infrastructure.
I have studied basic techniques of working with metals, but also alternative materials as resin and pigments, at Assamblage Contemporary Jewelry School. I have showed my first collection – Bare Fabrication at Author Contemporary Jewelry Fair, in November 2014 and received Autor Awesome Award in May 2015. This brought also the privilege to follow a jewelry course at Alchimia Contemporary School in Florence. I took part in Project A-III and Project A-IV – Assamblage alumni exhibitions, both as a jewelry designer and as an architect, designing the layout-installation of the exhibitions.
What are the main concepts translated through your work?
I create jewelries that express an universe of ideas, feelings, images, memories, an universe built, for each piece, from things that I experimented in different worlds. One of these worlds is at the confines of architecture and choreography. I work a lot with cut elements and sections, reassembling, rebuilding surfaces and structures on which I superimpose a new order, a new rhythm. I’m fascinated by the idea of movement transposed into object and the effect of movement, the versatility that a structure can have. I seek also in jewelry design, the space generated by movement and body or different entities. Therefore jewelry are for me choreographic structures.
In the pieces I make, I express the qualities of the metal, its essential nature, and the expression resulting from the process to which I submitted the material. By manipulating the process I capture a certain state of the material, and not the precious, well known image of it. Showing a still from the process means also a specific involvement in subjecting the process to the concept.
I believe in singular objects and in those ideas that make them exist and convince. For me these objects, whether they are architecture, jewels or clothing, talk about the continuity of the world and about the essence of our environment.
What material would you like to get to work with but haven’t had the chance yet?
I would like to work with clouds and wind, but I have not had the chance.
How would you describe the person wearing your jewellery?
I think every wearer is different. I imagine he, or she must be curious and have a playful spirit and a bit of decadent culture.
What is the best advice you have ever received?
Hard to say, perhaps one advice that I resonate with, is: the traveler is fit for the road.
If you were to be a piece of jewellery, what would you be?
I would be a pair of earrings, to be always in motion, to see the world around me and to have a 360 degree horizon, to move around.